Menu

9 ways to get into work for NDIS participants

While people with disability may face a few more barriers to participation in work than others, there are many organisations and programs to help people of all abilities to realise their vocational ambitions.

With the new year underway and many people returning to workplaces after two years of working from home, you or someone in your care may be wondering what options and supports there are for people with disability to follow their vocational ambitions. As well as being an excellent way to develop new skills and expand your social circle, participation in work can instil a sense of independence and purpose and can greatly increase a person’s confidence. Whether you or your participant wish to explore fields of interest through work experience or an internship or you’re looking for resources to assist with interview preparation and job hunting, there are a range of organisations, programs and supports to help make it happen. Our community team has put together key go-to resources to get you started.

Getting started 

These service providers can help people with disability to narrow their interests, prepare for work and find suitable employment opportunities.

JobAccess: JobAccess is a Government-funded initiative that aims to support the employment of people with disability. It provides information to job seekers and employees as well as employers and service providers.

Visit their website here or contact them by phone on 1800 464 800.

Disability Employment Services (DES): This is a national network of businesses that provide support to job seekers with a disability, injury or health condition. DES can offer assistance with resume preparation, interview skills and looking for jobs that match your skills and abilities. DES offers two streams, depending on a person’s level of need for support.

Find a local provider here. A Centrelink representative can also help to connect you with a nearby DES.

Australian Disability Enterprises (ADE): ADE is a group of over 600 organisations that provide supported employment opportunities to people with moderate to severe disabilities (usually intellectual disabilities). They offer opportunities in a number of areas including design, packaging, landscaping, manufacturing and hospitality.

Find ADE organisations across Australia here

Recruitability: Recruitability is an Australian Government-run scheme designed to encourage people with disability to apply for employment in the Australian Public Service (APS). The program allows people with disability who apply for vacancies the opportunity to automatically progress to the next stage of the recruitment process as long as they meet all eligibility and minimum requirements.

To find opportunities under Recruitability, visit the Australian Public Service Commission website here. You will need to go to ‘advanced search’ and select ‘RecruitAbility’ under ‘Programs and Initiatives’. RecruitAbility will display at the top of the job listings and a list of RecruitAbility jobs will appear.

Australian Network on Disability (AND): This member based organisation supports employers to include people with disability in their workplace by sharing resources and running training programs. AND also runs the Stepping Into Internship and the Positive Action towards Career Engagement (PACE) programs (see below).

->The Stepping Into Internship program provides skilled university students who experience disability with a paid internship at a leading business. The internship is a minimum of 152 hours.

->The PACE program is a mentoring program where students and job seekers with disability are matched with a professional from an Australian business. The program lets you meet with your mentor six to eight times in three months, for one or two hours at a time.

Visit the AND website here

NDIS support for work experience, work preparation and work life

Some funding may be able to obtained to support vocational goals. NDIS funding always depends on whether a support relates to the goals in a person’s NDIS plan. Work and study are no different. To obtain any possible funding, it is important to ensure that work and/or study goals are included in, or added to, the plan. (If you’re a participant, you will need to discuss this with your support coordinator, LAC or planner.) Generally, NDIS funding would be considered in cases where a person couldn’t obtain required assistance from a disability employment service (DES, see service providers, above). In specific terms, NDIS funding may be granted to provide extra workplace support because of your disability. E.g. assistance to stay on track with work tasks.

Funding for work preparation and work experience

If you or your participant are just starting to think about the possibility of employment, NDIS funding may assist with a sort of ‘feeling out’ process under the ‘capacity building – employment’ budget. To qualify for this category, a support must be deemed ‘reasonable and necessary’. This may enable a person to test their work skills through work experience, build relevant skills such as following directions and gain competencies to enable a transition to a disability employment service (DES) for participants who are ready or eligible.

No-stress NDIS referrals

Whether you’re a support coordinator, participant or parent or carer, navigating the fine print of your NDIS plan and turning it into an active treatment program can be daunting. As an NDIS-registered all-in-one allied healthcare provider, we make the process from referral to treatment simple and stress free. Simply click below to refer a participant or yourself and we’ll contact you within 48 hours to make an appointment and guide you through the path to stress-free treatment management at one of our three state-of-the-art multidisciplinary clinics, in Thomastown, Craigieburn and Templestowe Lower. Click here to make a referral.

No Comments

    Leave a Reply